So long 2021

Thank goodness we have reached the end of 2021! I am taking a longer break than usual and looking forward to no Zoom meetings for a month.

The greatest accomplishment of the year was getting through 105+ days of lockdown and simultaneous schooling and working from home. The week that school returned on campus, I tweeted: I cannot overstate how much better my working week has been with my children back at school. I have managed complex tasks requiring concentration and uninterrupted thinking. Still catching up but the seven things on my list marked urgent are almost finished.

Despite the interruptions, there is much collective work to be proud of and I am fortunate to be part of an accomplished team (pictured below on Zoom). We made a fun video to celebrate the highlights of the year. These included: a Beginning to Teach professional development program, Spotlight on Practice interviews, iLearn (learning management system) drop-in clinic, Bite-sized Learning and Teaching podcast, supporting 23000 online exam sittings in second semester, and facilitating Zoom for Teaching workshops.

I am also proud of: the work of the Teaching and Leadership community of practice (I presented these slides summarising the CoP at the Council of Australasian University Leaders in Learning and Teaching (CAULLT) conference), co-leading the Contemporary Approaches to University Teaching MOOC with Marina Harvey, and publishing an autoethnographic journal article on parenting and promotion in Life Writing.

Outside of work, the pandemic made the world feel small. Walking in our local area helped.

A special shout-out to my father who facilitated weekly Zoom lessons for his grandchildren, individually crafted according to their interests: time, water, chess, The Great Depression, maps, left-handedness, food, money, computers, building a house, book publishing, inventions, family history, electricity, and colonisation among other topics.

Finally, no yearly wrap up would be complete without sharing some of my favourite books of the year: Yaa Gyasi’s Transcendent Kingdom (a novel about a Ghanian American PhD candidate’s family), Alice Pung’s One Hundred Days (a novel about a pregnant teenage Korean Australian detained by her mother), Ocean Vuong’s On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous (fictionalised account of gay Vietnamese American son writing to his mother), Sara Foster’s The Hush (dystopian fertility fiction), Lisa Fuller’s Ghost Bird (an Australian Aboriginal YA mystery novel by award winning Wuilli Wuilli author), and Svetlana Alexievich’s The Unwomanly Face of War (oral history of Russian women in WW2).

So long 2021!

Edited to add: in my rush to farewell 2021, I forgot to share the news that the Slow Academic will have a new look next year thank you to the talented Fidel Fernando. I commissioned him to redesign the blog after the success of his artworks for the Over a Cuppa reflection series this year. Sadly he is leaving my team for a great opportunity at another university, but said farewell with this lovely image:

What’s nourishing you right now?

This is a short post. Blog writing has been slow. It’s not that there are no words — I have 56 draft posts in all stages of nearly-done to mostly-undone. Perhaps words are insufficient right now.

So, what’s nourishing you? What helps? What keeps you feeling alive? I have previously posted about holding on to holiday feelings, but we are now well and truly back at work and school. The homework has started.

Here are some things that are working for me:

  • A return of students to campus. Here in Australia, there is very little community transmission of COVID-19, and we haven’t seen this many students in one place since the final semester of 2019. Students change the energy of a campus. It is uplifting.
  • Co-leading the MOOC Contemporary Approaches to University Teaching with Marina Harvey. It is still open for enrolments, and has had participants from 106 countries around the world. I am particularly enjoying discussions on planning to teach and icebreaker activities.
  • Meeting colleagues on campus for face-to-face meetings and coffee. (With the opening of a new central hub, we have new places to try!) And, people, it is wonderful to see you fully embodied.
  • Taking a walk every day. Here are some photographs my son and I took of different barks on the way to school. Yes, we walk past many trees!

If it is not bark, I ask again: what is nourishing you right now?