Souls and universities

Feminist theorist Julia Kristeva begins New Maladies of the Soul with a provocative question: “These days, who has a soul?” Thinking about this, she writes, seems “frivolous and ill-advised” (1995, p 7); nonetheless, the question continues to worry at and excite her. In her search for a soul for our times, Kristeva proposes rereading sacred … Continue reading Souls and universities

Yarning circle

On Friday last week, I visited the beautiful campus of the University of Wollongong (on the coast south of Sydney for international readers) for a meeting of higher education scholars. I have written about this group previously (The spirit of research)—a loose gathering of like-minded researchers interested in higher education, universities, learning and teaching, and … Continue reading Yarning circle

In defence of book chapters

Writing book chapters is often discouraged in academia. Generally speaking, book chapters are less accessible for readers and do not generate as many citations. In quantified academia, they ‘count’ less. In a 2012 blog post, Dorothy Bishop analysed her publications and found her book chapters received a third the citations of her journal articles. Her … Continue reading In defence of book chapters

Anticipation

I love planning a holiday. There is as much pleasure in the anticipation as there is in the execution. Right now, we are looking forward to our family trip to Japan, prompted by my participation in the 6th International Academic Identities Conference in Hiroshima in September. We have plane tickets, our itinerary is mapped and … Continue reading Anticipation