Whose good university?

Last week I attended The Future of Academic Work: A deliberative conference at the University of Technology, Sydney. Its focus was a research project examining specific teaching-focussed, entry-level, continuing or fixed term (rather than sessional or casual) academic positions at Australian universities: The new Scholarly Teaching Fellow (STF) role was introduced into Australian universities in … Continue reading Whose good university?

Transformative learning

I am in two minds about transformative learning. Try this definition: "Transformative learning is the expansion of consciousness through the transformation of basic worldview and specific capacities of the self" (Elias, 1997, p 3). Or this: "Transformative learning involves experiencing a deep, structural shift in the basic premises of thought, feelings, and actions. It is … Continue reading Transformative learning

Curricula la la

Fresh from three plus days (and nights) of discussions about the curriculum architecture of the university, this post is a chance to gather my thoughts about understandings and assumptions of curricula in higher education. (Although I note that the plural form ‘curriculums’ seems to be increasingly in use across the university). About fourteen years ago, … Continue reading Curricula la la

Immortality (of a sort)

Last week I submitted a teaching module on the Politics of Higher Education (co-authored with Cathy Rytmeister) for peer review. All going well, it should be part of a MOOC (massive open online course, for those outside higher education) next year. [Update: you can find Contemporary Approaches to University Teaching here. Enrolments are open to … Continue reading Immortality (of a sort)

The liminality of graduation

I love graduations. I celebrated my first graduation—from a humble Bachelor of Arts—in 1999. From memory, I first participated in an academic procession in September 2012. I enjoy the pomp of graduation: winged gowns, polyester mimicking the textures of velvet and silk, the ceremonial mace, graduands’ inappropriate shoes for cobblestones, an operatic intermission, the occasional … Continue reading The liminality of graduation