In defence of book chapters

Writing book chapters is often discouraged in academia. Generally speaking, book chapters are less accessible for readers and do not generate as many citations. In quantified academia, they ‘count’ less. In a 2012 blog post, Dorothy Bishop analysed her publications and found her book chapters received a third the citations of her journal articles. Her … Continue reading In defence of book chapters

Anticipation

I love planning a holiday. There is as much pleasure in the anticipation as there is in the execution. Right now, we are looking forward to our family trip to Japan, prompted by my participation in the 6th International Academic Identities Conference in Hiroshima in September. We have plane tickets, our itinerary is mapped and … Continue reading Anticipation

Institutionalised reading

In my recent post on reading theoretical work, I gave two sentence summaries of complex work from Foucault and Butler, among others. I had cause to reflect on this decision recently while reading Michelle Boulous Walker's Slow Philosophy: Reading against the institution.  She describes slow reading as: ... an attentive rereading rather than speed reading … Continue reading Institutionalised reading

Frugal hedonism for academics

Over the weekend I read the delightful book The Art of Frugal Hedonism by Annie Raser-Rowland and Adam Grubb. Essentially a list of strategies for spending less money while enjoying life, it was the juxtaposition of frugal hedonism that grabbed me and the quirky tone that kept me reading. (Here's a great podcast conversation with … Continue reading Frugal hedonism for academics

The liminality of graduation

I love graduations. I celebrated my first graduation—from a humble Bachelor of Arts—in 1999. From memory, I first participated in an academic procession in September 2012. I enjoy the pomp of graduation: winged gowns, polyester mimicking the textures of velvet and silk, the ceremonial mace, graduands’ inappropriate shoes for cobblestones, an operatic intermission, the occasional … Continue reading The liminality of graduation

Back and forth

I love ongoing scholarly conversations that take place in the public sphere. I recently read Les Back's (2016) delightful Academic Diary: Or why higher education still matters which chronicles the seasonal temporalities of thirty years of academic life (with thanks to Tai Peseta for the recommendation). No doubt I will have more posts inspired by … Continue reading Back and forth