Two years on

The Slow Academic turns two today. It's difficult to sum up two years of blogging without resorting to metrics. Readily available figures include number of readers, most popular posts, the date of the best (most) views ever, numbers of followers and likes, average word length of posts, most popular day and hour for reading, and … Continue reading Two years on

Shock to thought

This is a continuation of the previous post, reflecting on the 6th International Academic Identities Conference at the University of Hiroshima. The four papers I discuss here were among the highlights of the (too few) sessions I attended. (I plan to email several participants whose intriguing-sounding presentations I missed, in the hope they share slides … Continue reading Shock to thought

Which university? Which self?

Barbara Grant’s keynote from HERDSA has been haunting me. It was a pleasure to listen to, and has rewarded slow consideration. Entitled A Thousand Tiny Universities, Barbara challenged the audience to think about ourselves, our universities, hope and the future. In writing this post, I am relying on memory, my sketchy notes and some brief … Continue reading Which university? Which self?

Yarning circle

On Friday last week, I visited the beautiful campus of the University of Wollongong (on the coast south of Sydney for international readers) for a meeting of higher education scholars. I have written about this group previously (The spirit of research)—a loose gathering of like-minded researchers interested in higher education, universities, learning and teaching, and … Continue reading Yarning circle

Notes on privilege

I had much of this post sketched out when I saw that the roguelinguist Alison Edwards has published a thoughtful thesiswhisperer post (and excellent round-up of links) on the privilege of slow academia: Slow academia represents privilege, they say: it’s for those who can afford it, who have already reached the scholarly summit, and it comes … Continue reading Notes on privilege