Shock to thought

This is a continuation of the previous post, reflecting on the 6th International Academic Identities Conference at the University of Hiroshima. The four papers I discuss here were among the highlights of the (too few) sessions I attended. (I plan to email several participants whose intriguing-sounding presentations I missed, in the hope they share slides … Continue reading Shock to thought

Hacking academia

Hack is an interesting word. Both verb and noun, it contains multiple (seemingly contradictory) meanings: to cut, notch, slice, chop, or sever to damage or injure by crude, harsh, or insensitive treatment; mutilate; mangle to deal or cope with; handle to circumvent security and break into (a network, computer, file, etc.) to make use of … Continue reading Hacking academia

Celebrating bluestockings

This week is Bluestocking Week, organised by the National Tertiary Education Union to celebrate women's achievements in education. You can read more about it here. 'Bluestocking' was originally a derogatory term to describe intellectual or literary woman, as Jeannie Rea writes: The term originates from the latter part of the 18th century as women started … Continue reading Celebrating bluestockings

Enjoying the little things

Last year, listening to the radio on the way to work, ABC Classic FM played a piece of music that was performed only once during the composer's life. It might have been Rachmaninoff's first symphony, which was difficult to write, had a disastrous first performance and triggered an episode of severe depression. Of his symphony, … Continue reading Enjoying the little things

Immortality (of a sort)

Last week I submitted a teaching module on the Politics of Higher Education (co-authored with Cathy Rytmeister) for peer review. All going well, it should be part of a MOOC (massive open online course, for those outside higher education) next year. [Update: you can find Contemporary Approaches to University Teaching here. Enrolments are open to … Continue reading Immortality (of a sort)

Tea with resistance

This post brings together a host of ideas from previous posts: tea, resistance, complicity¬†and activism. I recently read Richard Hil and Kristen Lyon's article A Post-Neoliberal Academy? in which the authors explore how academic compliance has been a key ingredient in the "neoliberal takeover" of universities. The authors list strategies of resistance that provide a … Continue reading Tea with resistance